Future technologies for everyone

It seems that an intelligent version of everything around us is now available: smart plugs, smart piggy banks and even smart diapers. And this is good. It’s fun. Sometimes it’s charming. However, only when all this comes together can we talk about the technologies of the future. Future technologies inspire and connect. They destroy conventions and question clichés and stereotypes. The technologies of the future are developments with a specific purpose. This is a race track with motorcycles equipped with sensors that transmit data faster than the wheels spin. This is a 3D printed bridge over a medieval canal. This is a virtual excursion to Mars for high school students in a small town.

Naturally, the technologies of the future are all about interaction, because more can be achieved together than alone. Our technologies, in the hands of the most progressive engineers in the world, university specialists and even motorcycle racers, help to solve problems of any scale that are urgent for the whole world, affecting the way we live, study, work and heal.

What Lenovo and its customers have in common is something very important: we believe in the technologies of the future to bring about real, meaningful change. The technology of the future permeates all areas of our lives and, more importantly, is characterized by inclusiveness. Future technologies don’t “know” who you are, what you look like, or what you love. It is a revolution that makes technological innovation accessible to people of all cultures, backgrounds, and incomes.
You can find our technological solutions in the most unpredictable and surprising places. In the near future, you might be able to walk across a stainless steel footbridge different from its neighbors, over the legendary canals of Amsterdam. As you cross the 12-meter arched bridge, dozens of sensors track your pace, the quality of the air you breathe, and the ambient temperature that makes you walk faster. Designed and developed by MX3D, the bridge has been 3D printed and will soon be installed in the capital of the Netherlands. Probably, this event will become a real revolution in the design and construction of cities, will open up new ways for mankind to obtain information about different parts of the planet and people living there.

If you are a researcher at the Leibniz Supercomputer Center (LRZ) in Munich, your job is to predict the unexpected and unexpected. LRZ experts use the Supremacy supercomputer based on the Lenovo Think System server cluster to develop highly accurate models of weather disasters in Canada and Europe. Thanks to the models created, so detailed that only a supercomputer can cope with them, the researchers were able to better understand the impact of climate change on meteorological phenomena. In addition, scientists are helping municipal authorities prepare for upcoming weather disasters with a high degree of probability.

If you are a researcher at the Ludwig and Maximilian University of Munich (LMU), your job is to predict all the unexpected and unexpected. Thanks to close cooperation with the specialists of the Leibniz Supercomputer Center (LRZ), natural disasters in Canada and Europe have been simulated with the highest degree of accuracy. For this, modern modeling systems based on the Supremacy supercomputer were used. At the heart of the newly installed Supremacy-NG supercomputer in the center is a cluster of liquid-cooled Lenovo Think System SD650 servers. Thanks to the models created, so detailed that only a supercomputer can cope with them, the researchers were able to better understand the impact of climate change on meteorological phenomena. In addition, scientists are helping municipal authorities prepare for impending weather disasters.

Sydney launched Australia’s first fully automated metro network this spring. The future has arrived! The Sydney Metro hired us to support mission-critical server applications, which means our technology helps passengers get to their destinations quickly and safely. What else will delight passengers? The interval of trains arriving at each station is 4 minutes.

Speed ​​is the bread and butter of Ducati MotoGP, for which Lenovo became a leading technology partner in 2018. Now Lenovo’s cutting-edge PCs, tablets and high-performance servers are used to train the world’s best motorcycle racers and preserve a 93-year Italian heritage of speed and race-winning. “The more computing power, the faster our bikes go,” says Stefano Rendzina, CIO of Ducati Corse.

The transformative potential of our future-proof solutions is not always as evident as is the case with today’s steel